Diverse experiences and backgrounds define what it means to be “in a relationship,” yet few of our relationships are romantic. So how do we define work relationships?

We spend a large chunk of workweek with people whom we are hard-pressed to describe to others. When coworkers become valued colleagues, welcome acquaintances, or good friends, we have personal expectations of what those relationships signify. (And to make things even more confusing, others often advise what those rapports are supposed to mean). Tonya Dalhaus joins Jess Dewell to discuss how we can describe our working relationships and what we must be aware of for personal fulfillment and career advancement.


Starting the Conversation…

  • What’s the difference between ‘in relationship’ and ‘in a relationship?’
  • Why is there worry about having deep work relationships?
  • How do stereotypes affect our relationships?

Host: Jessica Dewell
Co-host: Tonya Dalhaus

What You Will Hear:

The need for emotional support from colleagues (and avoid isolation).

Have peers to connect with to discuss boundaries, brainstorm, and build relationships with.

The ways to build relationships at work…and when as leaders participate.

Friendship defined.

Culture of friendship at work.

What to consider when choosing and considering a partnership.

Pet Peeves and common stereotypes.

Facing conflict, notice (and call out behaviors), build trust.

Workplace stereotypes and what we can do about them.

Networking no-no’s.

Why it’s bold to be in relationship.

Notable & Quotable:

Tonya Dalhaus: It’s hard to keep walls up when we are working with people in an intimate setting.

Jess Dewell: Boundaries move based on specific situations.

Tonya Dalhaus: Find [friendships] that keep you involved in the company.

Tonya Dalhaus: You can have personal relationships with the people you work with.

Jess Dewell: Necessary to discuss proactive ways to find solutions to challenges (at work).

Tonya Dalhaus: Know how conflict you deal with conflict.

Tonya Dalhaus: ’Maybe’ is off the table when you are with someone that really wants something.

Jess Dewell: We can be aware of bias and become aware of when it exists (coming from us and happening to us).

Tonya Dalhaus: Relationships are complex and have a lot of pieces.

Jess Dewell: Its the culmination of our boundaries, our desires, and the people we must know and need to know.

Jess Dewell: How can we do what we need to do and be all in.

Tonya Dalhaus: Focus on behaviors instead of stereotypes.

Resources:

Tags: relationship, friendship, leadership, management, emotions, communication, culture, support, boundaries, behavior