Delegation is mostly communication, and if we aren’t clear about what we want we have results that reflect the lack of understanding.

Successful teams (that use delegation) have three key skills that a leader needs to set the foundation: communication, accountability, and responsibility. Life experiences and business mentorship goes as far as the questions we ask. We can learn a lot from observation. We learn more when we ask for clarification and reflect on experiences to shape what we do next. Mark Carruthers joins Jessica Dewell to discuss effective delegation for results.


Program 64 - Delegation Versus DumpingStarting the Conversation:

  • What is delegation and how does it work?
  • When does delegation turn into dumping tasks we don’t like onto others?
  • What are the drawbacks of not delegating (or delegating incorrectly)?

Host: Jessica Dewell
Co-host: Mark Carruthers

What You Will Hear:

When we get in the way of others through being too involved.

Experience is a requirement for management (and the leaders in those roles).

Situations where PEOPLE are the obstacles to get around to complete projects.

The choice not to delegate.

The foundation of delegating starts with utilizing the strengths and interests of everyone.

Connection with the people we work with.

Accountability based on expectations. (And, that requires clear communication: talking more as well as asking questions.)

There are stupid questions – but not for the reason you think.

Feedback loops and the process of delegation.

Resources (time, people, money) and delegation.

Notable and Quotable:

Mark Carruthers: Controlling or submissive, these behaviors will break partnerships.

Jessica Dewell: When people are the obstacles, shift perspectives to get the job done.

Mark Carruthers: Take time to recognize the talents of the people on the team.

Mark Carruthers: When something needs to be done, I do it.

Jessica Dewell: Use skillsets of others for the right reasons.

Jessica Dewell: When our ego gets in the way, we can’t have a true connection with another person.

Mark Carruthers: Describe what’s being done clearly and set the expectations.

Mark Carruthers: I ask questions to understand the work that needs to be done.

Jessica Dewell: Responsibility – the buck stops here – doesn’t mean we have to have the answers.

Mark Carruthers: Within a business, when people stop giving feedback, it is hard on morale.

Resources:

  • Art of Asking by Amanda Palmer – TEDTalk
  • Art of Asking, by Amanda Palmer – book

Tags: respect, operations, skills, relationships, team building, choice, delegate, delegation, purpose, communication, assumptions, accountability, responsibility, attitude