[podcast src=”https://html5-player.libsyn.com/embed/episode/id/5572655/height/75/width/600/theme/standard/autonext/no/thumbnail/yes/autoplay/no/preload/no/no_addthis/no/direction/forward/” height=”75″ width=”600″] Sometimes we must keep our mouth closed and assess a situation so we know what we are facing – do we fight, do we flee, do we take action (and what are our motives for taking action?

Destructive behaviors come from our reactions. The HOW we deal and WHAT we choose to deal with. Stress runs rampant in our US society, and we’re beginning to recognize and deal with it. To choose action – facing the fight or flight response with increased personal awareness. Jessica Dewell talks with Melanie Greenberg about why change makes us nervous.


Program 75 - Change Makes Us NervousStarting the conversation…

  • What makes personalized learning a necessity for businesses today?
  • Can we rewire our brain?
  • How do we find and build a support network?

Host: Jessica Dewell

Guest: Melanie Greenberg

What You Will Hear:

How our brain is wired.

The amygdala and the frontal cortex determine our reactions before we can think.

Personal experience and life experience shape our automatic reactions.

Our baggage comes with us to work.

Some problems are not immediately solvable.

How to solve problems that come up (and that stress is just a problem to be solved).

Judgement and non-judgement with possible solutions.

Focus on the threat – the avoidance – closes our minds.

Reactions to stress and the relationship to emotions.

Stress proofing your brain (for resilience).

STOP. A mindfulness exercise.

Stop, drop, and roll – to approach business crisis.

When self pampering switches to avoidance.

Unknown stress versus pressure – where automatic pilot kicks in.

Build and cultivate relationships.

Notable & Quotable:

Melanie Greenberg: Sometimes, people overreact in the office because of their stress.

Melanie Greenberg: When we are around anxious people we get anxious too.

Jessica Dewell: We can’t hide our stress from our employees, even if we don’t stress out in front of them.

Melanie Greenberg: You’re as sick (or dysfunctional) as your secrets.

Melanie Greenberg: Is this the kind of problem that I need to change my attitude to remain grounded?

Melanie Greenberg: The best place is the middle ground where we experience both thoughts and feelings.

Jessica Dewell: We like to stick our noses places they don’t belong.

Melanie Greenberg: Sometimes its best to be with a situation and watch it unfold.

Resources:

Tags: stress, stimulus, brain function, brain, relationships, reactions, mindfulness, emotion, non-verbal, problem solving, non-judgement, resilience, health